Posts Tagged ‘Muslim Women’

The Hijabi 15

Hey people,

I need to write this post. I put on hijab about 2 years ago now, alHamdulilah. All’s good except I totally regret the pounds I put on because of it. I feel like such a bad Muslim because I’m mad about this even though it’s my own fault. Before I wore hijab my clothes were pretty form-fitting not skin tight but form fitting enough. I had a figure In was proud of and most importantly I was healthy and physically active. The switch of clothing made put my guard down and I gained some pounds. Actually I gained lots of unnecessary weigh (well not ALOT but more than I would like to have put on) and I’m also less physically active because I feel more self concious. So for any girls that are thinking of wearing hijab-go for it! But stay active and healthy. Once you hide in those loose clothes it’s sooo easy to let yourself go and I am so unbelievably upset that I did. Everyone says that you have to beware of the freshman 15 but I say beware of the hijabi 15 new hijabis!! Go for the hijab but not the extra pounds!! And I do NOT think it’s wrong or vain to want to keep a nice figure even if you’re not showing it. It’s for your health and personal satisfaction.

I’m also curious: did anyone else suffer from this?

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Things about Hijab that we apparently can’t repeat often enough

I read this great article today about how after so much argument, people STILL see the veil as representing oppression etc. I thought that the tagline, “I’m not oppressed, because I choose to dress this way” was repeated way too much, but the author of this article concludes that it’s not repeated enough.

The article is called Unveiling the Veil. Read it. I know articles about hijab get tiring because the subject is soo overdone, but this one is actually well-written. I got to the page and was rolling my eyes before I even started, but it’s actually not too bad. 🙂
Here are some of my favorite excerpts:

“In your typical introduction to women’s studies class, you might spend a few weeks (near the end of the semester) on “women of color.” If you’re lucky, one class period will be devoted to Islam and feminism. You’ll study a typical “liberal” feminist who criticizes the institution of purdah and asserts that it doesn’t allow women freedom. Then you’ll read the Muslim feminist who waxes lyrically about how she doesn’t have to worry about having abs of steel in time for bikini season. She then goes on to conclude that purdah is just fine, as long as it’s the choice of the woman herself.

At this point, everybody in the class is in solemn agreement: It’s not the fabric that’s the issue. It’s the coercion. No one should have to wear either a hijab or a bikini if she doesn’t want to. Class dismissed.”

“Listening to the Piliafas’ story reminded me that maybe Women’s Studies 101 isn’t that cliched after all. Many people still assume that by placing a piece of fabric on my head, I’ve pitched my brains into the dumpster, given my rights away to any male in a 50-mile radius and buried my voice in the backyard.”

Female Teacher of Ibn Battuta and Ibn Hajar al Asqalani

Bismillah

This post is about a notable female scholar of hadith during the Mamluk period in Egypt and Damascus.

One thing to note- these women were not anomalies in their time. The fact that women were scholars of hadith (and other things but this period there were a lot of hadith scholars) was a normal thing.

The ijaza system in the studies of hadith allowed children to receive ijazas before they came of age with the understanding that they would study and understand the texts later on in life. Hadith studies was open to everyone because many people could memorize, short and popular collections of hadith. Women excelled so much in this field that men eagerly sought them out as teachers to get ijazas from them. Another reason why the men sought them out was because these women had famous people in their chains of transmission and these men wanted to obtain these famous names in their own chains as well.

Zaynab Bint al Kamal is one example. She was a Hanbali of Damascus.  She transmitted popular and major works such as Sahih al Bukhari, Muslim and the Muwatta and many other little works as well.  Ibn Hajar al Asqalani learned from her. She appears in 139 of Ibn Hajar al Asqalani’s isnads. SubhanAllah.

Ibn Battuta also received ijaza from her In his book, Rihlat Ibn Battuta, he calls her a “traveler of the world” and she is listed a a person that granted him ijaza when he visited Damascus, Syria.

Roster of some more notable students Zaynab bint al Kamal :

  • Muhammad b. Ahmad ad-Dhahabi (d. 748 H/137)
  • Khalil al Safadi (d. 764 H /1362)
  • Taj-ad-Din as-Subki (d. 771 H/1369)

In Sunni Islamic scholarship, hadith has to be one of the most important branches. It is one of the major sources of law and women were at the forefront of its study and women never fabricated ahadith while men did.

This is during a time period when the Western women wouldn’t even imagine being schooled and Muslim women were at the forefront of the science of hadith. Look at the reputation that Muslim women have now. Many Muslim women in Muslim countries are illiterate. It’s sad that we are going backwards instead of forward. Everyone make dua that  Allah makes women come to the forefront of Islamic scholarship again side by side with men. Ameen.

And may He bless all of our wonderful scholars that have transmitted all of this knowledge to us.